A former director of the scientific police explains how AI is already speeding up the resolution of criminal investigations

A former director of the scientific police explains how AI is already speeding up the resolution of criminal investigations

By finding a trace of blood in the car of the main suspect, the scientific experts of the gendarmerie nationale played a fundamental role in Nordahl Lelandais’ confession made on February 14 regarding the “involuntary” murder of 9-year-old Maëlys.

It took five months of investigation, careful sampling, a completely boneless car and the use of lighting techniques and lasers to find the evidence that cracked Nordhal Lelandais.

But the investigators also collected several digital traces (internet searches, telephony, surveillance cameras…) to confront the suspect with his testimony.

And in the near future, the analysis of these digital files by artificial intelligence will further accelerate the resolution of investigations, believes a former police director, Worldwide.

“For example, if we recover twenty-four hours of RATP images, it would take hundreds of investigators to view them. But now with the progress of artificial intelligence, we are able to identify that nothing is happening on such a sequence, and therefore to pass it, or to tell computers to recognize a face,” Richard Marlet, former head of the regional judicial identity service of Paris, who teaches technical and scientific police at the Paris Institute of Criminology, tells the daily.

In June 2017, artificial intelligence had revived the Grégory case, started in 1984 — the software pointing out certain contradictions and designating forgotten suspects, by going to tap into the thousands of data of the investigation.

“The machine allows us to search for information and avoid being overwhelmed,” Christophe Krucker, a criminal analyst, told Le Monde last summer.

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